Visualizing the deployment gap in cars, carbon and more

Executive Editor

Cipher is proud to make our journalism free for all to read and republish. Unless otherwise noted, you may republish our articles for free as long as you abide by our Creative Commons license and the following terms: 

  • Credit Cipher and any co-reporting partners. In the byline, we prefer “Author Name, Publication(s).” At the top of the text of your story, include a line that reads: “This story was originally published by Cipher.” You must link the word “Cipher” to the original URL of the story.
  • If you’re republishing online, you must link to the URL of this story on ciphernews.com, include all of the links from our story and use our PixelPing tag.
  • If you use canonical metadata, please use the Cipher URL. For more information about canonical metadata, refer to this Google SEO link.
  • You can’t edit our material, except to reflect relative changes in time, location and editorial style. (For example, “yesterday” can be changed to “last week,” and “Portland, Ore.” to “Portland” or “here.”
  • For questions or help, please email news@ciphernews.com with the subject line: “Republishing.”
<header><h1>Visualizing the deployment gap in cars, carbon and more</h1><a href="" rel="author"></a><span class="title"></span><time rel="pubdate" datetime="2022-02-02T00:00:00-05:00">Feb 2, 2022</time></header><p>The climate provisions of the Build Back Better bill would give a boost of anywhere between 39% and 75% in key clean energy technologies, according to data by Rhodium Group, an independent research group.</p><p>Compared to current policy, which includes the recently enacted $1.2 infrastructure law, the Build Back Better policy would, by 2030, mean:</p><ul><li>43% more renewable electricity capacity (267 gigawatts compared to 381 gigawatts).</li><li>39% more carbon capture capacity installed (69 million tons of captured CO2 compared to 96 million).</li><li>75% more electric cars sold (24 million versus 42 million).</li><li>Electric vehicles would have a 16% larger share of total vehicle sales (34% versus 50%).</li></ul><div id="attachment_1733" style="width: 1300px" class="wp-caption alignnone"><img loading="lazy" decoding="async" aria-describedby="caption-attachment-1733" class="wp-image-1733 size-full" src="https://ciphernews.com/wp-content/uploads/2022/02/69857940-20ee-43c6-ba75-15ce442d5ca9.jpeg" alt="" width="1290" height="443" srcset="https://www.ciphernews.com/wp-content/uploads/2022/02/69857940-20ee-43c6-ba75-15ce442d5ca9.jpeg 1290w, https://www.ciphernews.com/wp-content/uploads/2022/02/69857940-20ee-43c6-ba75-15ce442d5ca9-300x103.jpeg 300w, https://www.ciphernews.com/wp-content/uploads/2022/02/69857940-20ee-43c6-ba75-15ce442d5ca9-1024x352.jpeg 1024w, https://www.ciphernews.com/wp-content/uploads/2022/02/69857940-20ee-43c6-ba75-15ce442d5ca9-768x264.jpeg 768w, https://www.ciphernews.com/wp-content/uploads/2022/02/69857940-20ee-43c6-ba75-15ce442d5ca9-1120x385.jpeg 1120w, https://www.ciphernews.com/wp-content/uploads/2022/02/69857940-20ee-43c6-ba75-15ce442d5ca9-775x266.jpeg 775w, https://www.ciphernews.com/wp-content/uploads/2022/02/69857940-20ee-43c6-ba75-15ce442d5ca9-545x187.jpeg 545w" sizes="(max-width: 1290px) 100vw, 1290px" /><p id="caption-attachment-1733" class="wp-caption-text">Source: <a href="https://rhg.com/?utm_source=hs_email&amp;utm_medium=email&amp;_hsenc=p2ANqtz-_B-If-og4Rvj0AO_TLPtQjplY-6Dj9PdW4g5hNvHd33ECyLfByeIn2XogIYe5tPtsNUtqz" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Rhodium Group</a></p></div><p>Without the BBB, it will be much harder for the U.S. to meet President Biden’s goal of halving U.S. emissions from 2005 levels by 2030, according to John Larsen, a partner with the Rhodium Group.</p><p>The group had found the BBB could get the U.S. as much as 50% of the way toward that goal, but <a href="https://rhg.com/research/build-back-better-congress-budget/?utm_source=hs_email&amp;utm_medium=email&amp;_hsenc=p2ANqtz-_AQYZ6E1JHlO7jSjk0zFsiE22wSpCAzRIxmtIVpTzUKECPYl4_AVRI5sn788ham-WL-bA3" target="_blank" rel="noopener" data-hs-link-id="0">that analysis</a> looked at an earlier version of the bill, which included more stringent measures, notably a clean electricity performance program.</p><p>Even if specific goals are slipping further out of reach, climate change is the type of problem you should never stop trying to solve.</p><p>As the actor Humphrey Bogart <a href="https://philosiblog.com/2012/01/23/things-are-never-so-bad-they-cant-be-made-worse/?utm_source=hs_email&amp;utm_medium=email&amp;_hsenc=p2ANqtz-_AQYZ6E1JHlO7jSjk0zFsiE22wSpCAzRIxmtIVpTzUKECPYl4_AVRI5sn788ham-WL-bA3" target="_blank" rel="noopener" data-hs-link-id="0">is quoted having said</a>, “things are never so bad they can’t be made worse.”</p><table style="height: 60px;" role="presentation" width="935" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0"><tbody><tr><td class="hs_padded"></td></tr></tbody></table>
Visualizing the deployment gap in cars, carbon and more

by -
February 2, 2022
The climate provisions of the Build Back Better bill would give a boost of anywhere between 39% and 75% in key clean energy technologies, according to data by Rhodium Group, an independent research group. Compared to current policy, which includes the recently enacted $1.2 infrastructure law, the Build Back Better policy would, by 2030, mean: 43% more renewable electricity capacity (267 gigawatts compared to 381 gigawatts). 39% more carbon capture capacity installed (69 million tons of captured CO2 compared to 96 million). 75% more electric cars sold (24 million versus 42 million). Electric vehicles would have a 16% larger share of total vehicle sales (34% versus 50%). Source: Rhodium Group Without the BBB, it will be much harder for the U.S. to meet President Biden’s goal of halving U.S. emissions from 2005 levels by 2030, according to John Larsen, a partner with the Rhodium Group. The group had found the BBB could get the U.S. as much as 50% of the way toward that goal, but that analysis looked at an earlier version of the bill, which included more stringent measures, notably a clean electricity performance program. Even if specific goals are slipping further out of reach, climate change is the type of problem you should never stop trying to solve. As the actor Humphrey Bogart is quoted having said, “things are never so bad they can’t be made worse.”